https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/jun/23/google-begins-removing-private-medical-records-from-search-results

Google begins removing private medical records from search results

Scrubbing medical records from search should help limit the damage caused by leaks, hacks and errors by medical institutions

Google begins scrubbing private medical records from its search results.
Google begins scrubbing private medical records from its search results. Photograph: Yui Mok/PA

Google has started removing private medical records from its search results, after adjusting its policy regarding personal information.

The change was made on Thursday to include the “confidential, personal medical records of private people” in the bracket of information Google may remove unprompted from search results. Other examples of such information include national or government issued identification numbers, bank account numbers, credit card numbers and images of signatures.

The leaking of private medical records can be extremely damaging to the victims, both financially and emotionally, with future prospects affected and private lives of the vulnerable exposed. Given that Google’s indexing system will capture anything that’s publicly accessible on the internet, leaks such as those created by an Indian pathology lab which uploaded more than 43,000 patient records inDecember, including names and HIV blood test results, can be particularly damaging.

The last change to the removal policy was made in 2015 with the addition of “nude or sexually explicit images that were uploaded or shared without your consent” to cover so-called revenge porn.

The new addition to Google’s scrubbing policy marks a change from the search company’s traditional hands-off, algorithmic approach which resists attempts at censorship. This has come under scrutiny over the last few years due to the spread of fake news and misinformation. Google recently adjusted its search results to down-rank contested information such as fake news.

For many Google has become the gateway to the internet, meaning that removal from the company’s search results effectively scrubs them from the internet. While the information will still be accessible via other search engines or directly, other associated actions including the European right to be forgotten have seen being removed from Google’s search results as good enough to affect change.

Google has recently come under fire for its search and services such as YouTube being used to spread extremist content, as well as its ad network being used to fund sites dedicated to spreading hate speech and propaganda. The company introduced new measures for YouTube to tackle the spread of terrorist material, while its head of European operations apologised after adverts for major brands appeared next to extremist material.

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